07 May

10 Years

So for the tenth anniversary, the Zen Garden is open for business once more. I’ve thrown the codebase on Github, given the dusty copy a refresh, started the conversion of the site to HTML5, and brought all of the existing designs kicking and screaming into the modern age. The work isn’t done yet, but it’s a darn sight closer to what how we would build it these days. If you see an area that needs help, consider sending a patch.

Hello CSS Zen Garden, it’s been awhile.

07 May

Line Clampin’ | CSS-Tricks

You want X lines of text. Anything after that, gracefully cut off. That’s “line clamping” and it is a perfectly legit desire. When you can count on text being a certain number of lines, you can create stronger and more reliable grids from the elements that contain that text, as well as achieve some symmetric aesthetic harmony.

There are a couple of ways to get it done, none of them spectacular.

If you are doing Web Design/Development as a full-time and aren’t reading CSS-Tricks, you really should be. Awesome little tricks like this one..

07 May

Google’s Buildings Hackable

We reported this issue to the Google Vulnerability Rewards Program (VRP). After much heckling from my former colleagues at Google, they quickly pulled this system offline. We also applaud Google for creating a program like the VRP and giving us the chance to share our story with a wider audience. At the time of this blog post, this exact issue affects tens of thousands of devices on the Internet and thousands of different organizations. Thank you Google for helping us raise awareness on this issue! I asked that any proceeds from the VRP be donated to the Wounded Warrior Project, but apparently this issue doesn’t qualify for VRP rewards.

If you have a corporate campus or a modern building of any sort… you’re likely running similar systems someplace on your network. We’ve already discovered over twenty five thousand of these systems facing the Internet… one down, twenty four thousand, nine hundred, ninety nine to go 🙂

If Google can fall victim to an ICS attack, anyone can.

Hacking systems that control a building infrastructure.

06 May

Senate passes Internet sales tax in final vote, 69-27

The US Senate passed an online sales tax in a vote this afternoon after a heated final round of debate. A small group of anti-tax Republicans, as well as Democratic Senators from states without sales tax like Montana and Oregon, argued vociferously against the bill—but to no avail.

The final vote was 69-27, not much different than the 74-20 procedural vote that took place two weeks ago. The proposal has hardly changed at all in two weeks. The Marketplace Fairness Act, S.743, would allow states and localities to make Internet retailers collect sales tax from their customers if they do more than $1 million per year in out-of-state online sales.

The bill would allow states to write laws that would force e-commerce businesses to collect sales taxes. Right now consumers are supposed to keep track of any online sales and then report them to their state government and pay sales tax on the purchase. It still has to go through the House where passage is a little more rough but don’t be too shocked if in a few months you have to start investigating adding sales tax to any e-commerce software.