20 Jul

Cloud Computing News – Amazon storing more than 449B objects in S3

Amazon Web Services announced on Tuesday afternoon that its Simple Storage Service (S3) now houses more than 449 billion objects. The rapid pace of S3′s growth is a microcosm of both AWS’ overall business as well as cloud computing in general.

At Structure 2011 last month, Amazon CTO Werner Vogels told the crowd that S3 was storing 339 billion objects. At this same time last year, the service was only storing 262 billion objects. One might also draw a parallel to the ever-growing cloud revenues at Rackspace, the incredible amount of computing capacity AWS adds every day or the mass proliferation of new Software-as-a-Service offerings.

via Cloud Computing News – Amazon storing more than 449B objects in S3. That is crazy impressive both the sheer number of objects stored and the growth rate.

10 May

NYTimes.com – Google’s Digital Music Service Falls Short of Ambition

But the service that the company unveiled on Tuesday, called Music Beta by Google, fell short of those ambitions. There is no store, the streaming function comes with restrictions, and, like Amazon’s Cloud Drive service announced in March, using it requires a long upload process.What came between Google and its ambitions was an obstacle familiar to many digital music start-ups: despite months of negotiations, the company could not obtain licenses from the major record companies.In interviews, Google executives put the blame squarely on the labels. “Generally there were demands on the business side that we think were unreasonable and don’t enable us to have a sustainable, scalable music business,” said Zahavah Levine, director of content partnerships for Google’s Android unit and the lead negotiator with the labels.Music Beta was introduced on Tuesday at Google I/O, a developers’ conference in San Francisco.

via NYTimes.com – Google’s Digital Music Service Falls Short of Ambition. This doesn’t bode well for what we all really want, stream our already owned music collection without having to upload it, wonder if Apple will have any better luck with the record labels.

24 Apr

Twilio Engineering Blog – Why Twilio Wasn’t Affected by Today’s AWS Issue

Starting early this morning, Amazon Web Services experienced several service problems at one of its east coast datacenters. The outage impacted major sites across the Internet. The number of high profile sites affected by the issue shows both the amazing success of cloud services in enabling the current Internet ecosystem, and also the importance of solid distributed architectural design when building cloud services.

Twilio’s APIs and service were not affected by the AWS issues today. As we’ve grown and scaled Twilio on Amazon Web Services, we’ve followed a set of architectural design principles to minimize the impact of occasional, but inevitable issues in underlying infrastructure.

via Twilio Engineering Blog – Why Twilio Wasn’t Affected by Today’s AWS Issues. Twilio on how to build a service that was able to deal with Amazon’s downtime.