10 Sep

SiliconFilter – Bing: What’s More Evil Than Satan Himself? 10^100

Besides the new definition for “hiybbprqag,” Arnt also found that Bing now defines the search for “more evil than satan himself” as 10^100 – a Googol, the word the Google founders used as the basis of their company’s name.

via SiliconFilter – Bing: What’s More Evil Than Satan Himself? 10^100. Stay classy Microsoft.

30 Apr

Business Insider – Can We Please Stop Pretending That Microsoft’s Bing Is Doing Well?

Microsoft’s Bing search engine is indeed gaining some share of search queries in the US market (globally, Bing is nowhere). But it is gaining this share at an absolutely mind-boggling cost. Specifically, Microsoft is gaining share for Bing by doing spectacularly expensive distribution deals, deals that don’t even come close to paying for themselves in additional revenue.

How much is Microsoft spending to buy market share for Bing?

Based on an analysis of Microsoft’s financial statements, Bing is paying about 3X as much for every incremental search query as it generates in revenue from that query.

What does that mean?

It means that for every $1 Microsoft generates from each new search query it buys, it spends $3 to get it.

(And that’s just direct costs–the costs of obtaining and processing the query. It doesn’t include sales and marketing, research and development, and general and administrative costs–all of which are subtracted from the -$2 Microsoft has already lost on every new query.)

Don’t believe it?

Let’s go to the numbers.

via Business Insider – Can We Please Stop Pretending That Microsoft’s Bing Is Doing Well?. Is Bing at this point helping or hurting Microsoft?

09 Feb

41Latitude – Google Maps & Label Readability — Part 3

While my December investigation uncovered the reasons behind Google Maps’s superior label readability, it did little to explain why Google Maps’s cities actually seem to “pop” from the maps. Different label classes, bright white outlines, and the decluttering of cities outside of major metro areas all account for Google’s superior label readability—but they fail to explain why cities seem to “stand out just a little sooner” on Google Maps.

I’ve long suspected that there was something else at work on Google’s maps, but I haven’t been able to put my finger on it… that is, until now. In retrospect, my December investigation was so fixated on text labels, that I missed something big… something really big. And it has nothing to do with text.

via 41Latitude – Google Maps & Label Readability — Part 3. Interesting in how little things add up to really improve your experience.