24 Nov

Ars Technica – Google drops the axe on its internal renewable energy work

So although RE < C wasn’t misguided, its cancellation isn’t going to have a discernible impact on the renewable energy field, since companies that specialize in this field were outperforming it. And, unlike many of the companies that are also suffering in this fast-moving and competitive market, Google at least has a profitable side-business to turn to.

via Ars Technica – Google drops the axe on its internal renewable energy work. Ars answers my earlier question.

24 Nov

BBC News – Google kills off seven more products including Wave

Google has announced that it is dropping seven more products in an effort to simplify its range of services.

The out-of-season "spring clean" brings an end to services including Google Wave, Knol and Google Gears.

It is the third time that the US firm has announced a cull of several of its products at the same time after they had failed to take off.

via BBC News – Google kills off seven more products including Wave. So most of the products make sense to kill off they either never generated much traction or were already supposed to be cut. However the big thing that got cut that I want to know more about is the “Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal”. Why was it cut, the goal was unachievable, just pure business decisions or money better spent in other renewable energy projects?

06 Mar

Scientific American Blogs – Observations: Can we get off oil now?

To be clear, the goal is to break U.S. addiction to oil, not just foreign oil. Oil prices are global, and as Woolsey points out, the U.S. has no domestic leverage. Greatly increasing our own offshore oil drilling could lower imports a little, but it won’t lower world prices; it is too easy for OPEC to manipulate production to offset the effects of any new U.S. supply.

The payoff of significantly reducing oil consumption would reach far beyond the economy and the environment, by the way. A study by Boyden Gray and Andrew Varcoe noted that oil companies are permitted under a waiver of the Clean Air Act to include known carcinogens such as benzene, toluene and xylene in gasoline, which raise octane (power output). The study showed that the added cost to healthcare and shortened lives in the U.S. comes to more than $100 billion a year.

The U.S. can take a number of steps to reduce oil consumption and to create liquid fuels that can substitute for oil.

via Scientific American Blogs – Observations: Can we get off oil now?. The argument of drill here, drill now, doesn’t really mean much.