26 Jan

whatwg – Requests for new elements for comments

We already have an element for comments and other self-contained document modules, namely, <article>. The spec in fact specifically calls out an <article> nested in another <article> as being, by definition, a comment <article> on the outer <article>

via whatwg – Requests for new elements for comments. Want to do comments on your new spiffy HTML5 site, use an article element inside your main article element.

09 Nov

Mozilla Popcorn – Making video work like the web

Popcorn makes video work like the web. We create tools and programs to help developers and authors create interactive pages that supplement video and audio with rich web content, allowing your creations to live and grow online.

via Mozilla Popcorn – Making video work like the web. The video at the link makes it a little bit clearer. The concept is basically at points in the video you can load in data from the web about the video or what’s shown in the video from Twitter, Wikipedia, Google Maps and other stuff.

04 Oct

Eric’s Archived Thoughts – Searching For Mark Pilgrim

Just yesterday, I took a screenshot of the title page of Dive Into HTML5 to include in a presentation as a highly recommended resource. Now it’s gone. That site, along with all the other “Dive Into…” sites (Accessibility, Python, Greasemonkey, etc.) and addictionis.org, is returning an HTTP “410 Gone” message. Mark’s Github, Google+, Reddit, and Twitter accounts have all been deleted. And attempts to email him have been bounced back.

via Eric’s Archived Thoughts – Searching For Mark Pilgrim. It would be quite depressing not to have those resources available, Dive Into HTML5 was "the" online resource for HTML5. I can’t speak for knowing Mark Pilgrim personally but his work has been awesome.

Update: 11:30pm: “The communication was specifically verified, it was him, and that’s that. That was the single hardest decision I’ve had to make this year.” https://twitter.com/#!/textfiles/status/121436401131716608 Nice to hear.

31 Mar

Mobile Boilerplate

Mobile Boilerplate is your trusted template made custom for creating rich and performant mobile web apps. You get cross-browser consistency among A-grade smartphones, and fallback support for legacy Blackberry, Symbian, and IE Mobile. Mobile Boilerplate is not a framework, but works well with projects like jQuery Mobile, Sencha Touch, Phonegap and Appcelerator. You get an offline caching setup for free, fast button clicks, a media query polyfill, and many common mobile WebKit optimizations waiting for you. Use Mobile Boilerplate to start your mobile webapp quickly and immediately benefit from community best practices.

via Mobile Boilerplate. Awesome resource.

10 Mar

PhobosLab – The State of HTML5 Audio

When I started to work on my JavaScript Game Engine back in October 2009, the biggest problems I encountered were with the new HTML5 Audio Element. The Canvas Element already worked nicely in all browsers that supported it at the time, albeit some were a little slow.

Now, in 2011, the rendering performance for Canvas has been improved dramatically, audio however is still broken in large parts. I think it is time for a change in tone. Be warned, there’s some profanity ahead because HTML5 Audio is still that fucked up.

via PhobosLab – The State of HTML5 Audio. I especially enjoy the specific complaints directed at Apple and Microsoft for only supporting MP3.

22 Feb

TechCrunch – Yahoo Engineer Complains About Lack Of Innovation At Yahoo

Right now Flickr video does support HTML5, but apparently only if it detects you have an iPad. And while the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari and even IE9 are compatible with HTML5 (which does not require you to install a plugin to view video), people who want to watch Flickr videos without having to download Flash are out of luck. It’s enough to make a Technical Yahoo! go to Vimeo!

via TechCrunch – Yahoo Engineer Complains About Lack Of Innovation At Yahoo. What cruddy work Yahoo.

31 Dec

Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report – 2010: The Year in Web Standards

WHAT A YEAR 2010 has been. It was the year HTML5 and CSS3 broke wide; the year the iPad, iPhone, and Android led designers down the contradictory paths of proprietary application design and standards-based mobile web application design—in both cases focused on user needs, simplicity, and new ways of interacting thanks to small screens and touch-sensitive surfaces.

via Jeffrey Zeldman Presents The Daily Report – 2010: The Year in Web Standards. What a year indeed for web design and web standards.

05 Dec

James Clark’s Random Thoughts – XML vs the Web

There’s a bigger point that I want to make here, and it’s about the relationship between XML and the Web. When we started out doing XML, a big part of the vision was about bridging the gap from the SGML world (complex, sophisticated, partly academic, partly big enterprise) to the Web, about making the value that we saw in SGML accessible to a broader audience by cutting out all the cruft. In the beginning XML did succeed in this respect. But this vision seems to have been lost sight of over time to the point where there’s a gulf between the XML community and the broader Web developer community; all the stuff that’s been piled on top of XML, together with the huge advances in the Web world in HTML5, JSON and JavaScript, have combined to make XML be perceived as an overly complex, enterprisey technology, which doesn’t bring any value to the average Web developer.

This is not a good thing for either community (and it’s why part of my reaction to JSON is "Sigh"). XML misses out by not having the innovation, enthusiasm and traction that the Web developer community brings with it, and the Web developer community misses out by not being able to take advantage of the powerful and convenient technologies that have been built on top of XML over the last decade.

So what’s the way forward? I think the Web community has spoken, and it’s clear that what it wants is HTML5, JavaScript and JSON. XML isn’t going away but I see it being less and less a Web technology; it won’t be something that you send over the wire on the public Web, but just one of many technologies that are used on the server to manage and generate what you do send over the wire.

In the short-term, I think the challenge is how to make HTML5 play more nicely with XML. In the longer term, I think the challenge is how to use our collective experience from building the XML stack to create technologies that work natively with HTML, JSON and JavaScript, and that bring to the broader Web developer community some of the good aspects of the modern XML development experience.

via James Clark’s Random Thoughts – XML vs the Web. I’m not even sure anymore about the idea of XML to manage your server solutions is going to be used much going forward. I’m really leaning towards calling XML an end-of-life technology.

17 Oct

QuirksBlog – The HTML5 drag and drop disaster

After spending about a day and a half in testing I am forced to conclude that the HTML5 drag and drop module is not just a disaster, it’s a fucking disaster.

The module should be removed from the HTML5 specification straight away, and conforming browsers should disable it at their earliest opportunity pending a complete rewrite from the ground up.

Web developers MUST NOT (in the sense of RFC 2119) use HTML 5 drag and drop. They should use old-school scripts instead.

via QuirksBlog – The HTML5 drag and drop disaster. So that’s drag and drop kids.