15 Sep

GitHub – gimenete/iOS-boilerplate

This project is inspired on HTML5 boilerplate.

  • It is intended to provide a base of code to start with
  • It is not intended to be a freamwork
  • It is intented to be modified and extended by the developer to fit their needs
  • It includes solid third-party libraries if needed to not reinvent the wheel

via GitHub – gimenete/iOS-boilerplate. This looks impressive for anyone building an iOS app.

15 May

Timeless – JSON: The JavaScript subset that isn’t

Because of these two invisible Unicode characters, JSON is not a subset of JavaScript. Close, but no cigar.

In most applications, you won’t notice this issue. First of all, the line separator and the paragraph separator isn’t exactly widely used. Secondly, any proper JSON parser will have no problems with parsing it.

However, when you’re dealing with JSONP there’s no way around: You’re forced to use the JavaScript parser in the browser. And if you’re sending data that other have entered, a tiny U+2028 or U+2029 might sneak in and break your pretty cross-domain API.

via Timeless – JSON: The JavaScript subset that isn’t. Wikipedia is wrong man.

05 Dec

James Clark’s Random Thoughts – XML vs the Web

There’s a bigger point that I want to make here, and it’s about the relationship between XML and the Web. When we started out doing XML, a big part of the vision was about bridging the gap from the SGML world (complex, sophisticated, partly academic, partly big enterprise) to the Web, about making the value that we saw in SGML accessible to a broader audience by cutting out all the cruft. In the beginning XML did succeed in this respect. But this vision seems to have been lost sight of over time to the point where there’s a gulf between the XML community and the broader Web developer community; all the stuff that’s been piled on top of XML, together with the huge advances in the Web world in HTML5, JSON and JavaScript, have combined to make XML be perceived as an overly complex, enterprisey technology, which doesn’t bring any value to the average Web developer.

This is not a good thing for either community (and it’s why part of my reaction to JSON is "Sigh"). XML misses out by not having the innovation, enthusiasm and traction that the Web developer community brings with it, and the Web developer community misses out by not being able to take advantage of the powerful and convenient technologies that have been built on top of XML over the last decade.

So what’s the way forward? I think the Web community has spoken, and it’s clear that what it wants is HTML5, JavaScript and JSON. XML isn’t going away but I see it being less and less a Web technology; it won’t be something that you send over the wire on the public Web, but just one of many technologies that are used on the server to manage and generate what you do send over the wire.

In the short-term, I think the challenge is how to make HTML5 play more nicely with XML. In the longer term, I think the challenge is how to use our collective experience from building the XML stack to create technologies that work natively with HTML, JSON and JavaScript, and that bring to the broader Web developer community some of the good aspects of the modern XML development experience.

via James Clark’s Random Thoughts – XML vs the Web. I’m not even sure anymore about the idea of XML to manage your server solutions is going to be used much going forward. I’m really leaning towards calling XML an end-of-life technology.