08 Mar

Freedom to Tinker – Seals on NJ voting machines, March 2009

Nothing better illustrates the State’s "band-aid approach, where serious security vulnerabilities can be covered over with ad hoc fixes" (as Roger characterizes it) than this. The superglue will interfere with the ability for election workers to (legitimately) remove the seal to maintain the machine. The superglue will make it more difficult to detect tampering, because it goes on in such a variable way that the inspector doesn’t know what’s supposed to be "normal." And the extremely soft adhesive on the tape seal is extremely difficult to clean up, when the election worker (legitimately) removes it to maintain the machine. Of course, one must clean up all the old adhesive before resealing the voting machine.

Furthermore, Roger demonstrated for the Court that all these seals can still be defeated, with or without the superglue.

via Freedom to Tinker – Seals on NJ voting machines, March 2009. So security seals protecting those voting machines, useless.

27 Jan

Freedom to Tinker – Seals on NJ voting machines, 2004-2008

Those five criteria are just common sense about what would be a required in any effective system for protecting something using tamper-indicating seals. What I found was that (1) the seals aren’t always there; (2) even if they were, you can remove the cartridge without visible evidence of tampering with the seal and (3) you can remove the circuit-board cover without even disturbing the plastic-strap seal; (4) even if that hadn’t been true, the seal-inspection records are quite lackadaisical and incomplete; and (5) even if that weren’t true, since the counties tend to re-use the same serial numbers, the attacker could just obtain fresh seals with the same number!

via Freedom to Tinker – Seals on NJ voting machines, 2004-2008. So security seals, not so secure.