24 Jan

NYTimes.com – Bush White House Broke Elections Law, Report Says

The Bush White House, particularly before the 2006 midterm elections, routinely violated a federal law that prohibits use of federal tax dollars to pay for political activities by creating a “political boiler room” that coordinated Republican campaign activities nationwide, a report issued Monday by an independent federal agency concludes.

The report by the Office of Special Counsel finds that the Bush administration’s Office of Political Affairs — overseen by Karl Rove — served almost as an extension of the Republican National Committee, developing a “target list” of Congressional races, organizing dozens of briefings for political appointees to press them to work for party candidates, and sending cabinet officials out to help these campaigns.

via NYTimes.com – Bush White House Broke Elections Law, Report Says. Wonder if Karl Rove is going to get asked on Fox News how this happened and what happens if charges are actually filed against him or the person who made the decisions to do this?

09 Dec

NYTimes.com – O’Donnell’s Magic Turns Loss into Win

“Today marks a lot of tragedy,” Ms. O’Donnell said after headlining a fundraiser for the Northern Virginia Tea Party on Tuesday night. “Tragedy comes in threes: Pearl Harbor, Elizabeth Edwards’s passing and Barack Obama’s announcement of extending the tax cuts, which is good, but also extending the unemployment benefits.”

via NYTimes.com – O’Donnell’s Magic Turns Loss into Win. How do you make that statement in all seriousness? How is it good for tax breaks to be extended that mostly benefit the wealthy good and extending unemployment benefits so people don’t end up on the street a tragedy? Oh yeah and which actually costs less and provides better than half the number of jobs the other does (so overall a better deal – costs less per expected job created) unemployment benefits. But yeah kicking people out of their homes is a good thing.

02 Aug

NYTimes.com – Defining Prosperity Down

The point is that a large part of Congress — large enough to block any action on jobs — cares a lot about taxes on the richest 1 percent of the population, but very little about the plight of Americans who can’t find work.

via NYTimes.com – Defining Prosperity Down. Krugman once again with arguing forcefully and eloquently for some rational decision making on the part of economic policy.