16 Feb

Frankie Roberto – Responsive Text

Some websites now contain ‘responsive images’. These scale (or crop) depending upon your screen’s viewing area, so the image sizes remain appropriate whether you’re looking at the website on a mobile phone, or on a huge flat screen monitor.

This is an example of responsive text.

The amount of textual detail scales relative to your screen size.

The effect is achieved using simple HTML class names and CSS media queries which show or hide the content depending upon the current screen width.

via Frankie Roberto – Responsive Text. In agreement, nifty idea, but defiantly unsure of the practical application.

15 Feb

Incubaid Research – Rediscovering the RSync Algorithm

Don’t walk the folder and ‘rsync’ each file you encounter. A small calculation will show you how bad it really is.

Suppose you have 20000 files, each 1KB. Suppose 1 rsync costs you about 0.1s (reading the file, sending over the signature, building the stream of updates, applying them). This costs you about 2000s or more than half an hour.

System administrators know better:they would not hesitate: “tar the tree, sync the tars, and untar the synced tar”.

Suppose each of the actions takes 5s (overestimating) you’re still synced in 15s.

via Incubaid Research – Rediscovering the RSync Algorithm. The right way to synch two remote file systems.

06 Feb

Tinycon – Favicon Alerts

Tinycon allows the addition of alert bubbles and changing the favicon image. Tinycon gracefully falls back to a number in title approach for browers that don’t support canvas or dynamic favicons.

Alerts in the favicon allow users to pin a tab and easily see if their attention is needed.

via GitHub – Tinycon. Pretty sure I could count the times I actually looked at a favicon alert on one hand, that being said nice work.

26 Jan

Michael Tsai – PDFpen and iCloud

It’s no longer possible to write a single app that takes advantage of the full range of Mac OS X features. Some APIs only work inside the Mac App Store. Others only work outside it. Presumably, this gap will widen as more new features are App Store–exclusive, while sandboxing places greater restrictions on what App Store apps are allowed to do.

via Michael Tsai – PDFpen and iCloud. My largest long-term fear of OSX is that Apple will slowly turn off the ability for applications to be useful without using the App Store and thus some Apps may just not exist anymore (SuperDuper is the easy example).

26 Jan

whatwg – Requests for new elements for comments

We already have an element for comments and other self-contained document modules, namely, <article>. The spec in fact specifically calls out an <article> nested in another <article> as being, by definition, a comment <article> on the outer <article>

via whatwg – Requests for new elements for comments. Want to do comments on your new spiffy HTML5 site, use an article element inside your main article element.

24 Jan

inessential.com – Fantastical and language detection

I like this. The best Mac developers have been famous for taking the extra steps. Most people won’t need this — but those who do it will delight.

via inessential.com – Fantastical and language detection. That is practically the definition of great software, causing your users delight in the everyday workings.

15 Jan

wingolog – Javascript eval Considered Crazy

What can an engine do when it sees eval?

Not much. It can’t even prove that it is actually eval unless eval is not bound lexically, there is no with, there is no intervening non-strict call to any identifier eval (regardless of whether it is eval or not), and the global object’s eval property is bound to the blessed eval function, and is configured as DontDelete and ReadOnly (not the default in web browsers).

But the very fact that an engine sees a call to an identifier eval poisons optimization: because eval can introduce variables, the scope of free variables is no longer lexically apparent, in many cases.

I’ll say it again: crazy!!!

via wingolog – Javascript eval Considered Crazy. No matter how crazy and unsafe you consider eval this is just going to scare you a little more.

11 Jan

Gigantt Blog – The GitHub Job Interview

That’s why I’m advocating the GitHub job interview. Open-Source projects are a fantastic way to collaborate with people you don’t know too well. And GitHub in particular, with its ease of forking and pull-requests is just the best (and biggest) platform for open-source collaboration.

Here’s what you do. You come up with a cool idea of an open-source project. This becomes your company’s development sandbox. Candidates are asked to then contribute to the project in some way. You want to see them code? Ask them to develop a module. You want to see them tackle a bug? Ask them to choose one from the bug-list. This works for every aspect of development work. You can design features together. You can gauge their communication skills. You can see how well they handle reviews. You can ask them to document their work and see how well they can write. But above all, you’re not taking advantage of anyone, and true developers probably won’t mind investing time into an open-source effort. 

Choose your GitHub project wisely. It should be something relatively fun. It ought to use the same technology stack your company uses. And it should be relatively simple to grasp, because the point is not to be investing too much time training people you’re not yet hiring.

via Gigantt Blog – The GitHub Job Interview. This sounds like a really solid way to do a job interview.

02 Jan

kickingbear – Learn to X

Jalkut wrote this piece, Learn to Code. Read it, it’s well worth your time. Simmons linked to Jalkut’s piece adding this, “I’m reminded of Matt Mullenweg saying ‘Scripting is the new literacy.’ Matt’s right.”

I appreciate where they’re coming from. I can, from a certain perspective, agree with the argument. But, let’s not kid ourselves, literacy is the new literacy. The ability to read, comprehend, digest and come to rational conclusions — that’s what we need more of. We don’t, as a society, need more people who have the mechanical knowledge to turn RSS feeds into Twitter spam. We don’t need anything more posted to Facebook, we don’t need anything we photograph to appear on Instagram and Flickr. If “scripting” is the new literacy then we’ve failed. We’ve become Mario drowning on a Water Level.

Scripting isn’t the new literacy, it’s the new tinkering with the engine, the new re-wiring the house. The new DIY for the digital age. These sorts of skills are incredibly valuable, but they’re not now, and certainly won’t be in the future, anything close to being an art form that stirs our souls.

That’s what literature does — it communicates to humans by leveraging our understanding of words and our grasp of narrative. And, sometimes, it mixes them all up but we still get value from it. That’s not how writing code works. Writing code is a craft, we build upon the capabilities of the compiler, the libraries and the hardware. We don’t have the freedom to innovate, as an author would, unless we control the whole stack. And we don’t. We swim upon a shallow surface, we perform what amounts to an act of synchronized swimming. At times it’s beautiful, but we’re in a pool, and we can’t control how wide or deep it is.

If you’re reading this, it’s probably too late. I’ll say to you — don’t Learn To Code, just Learn. Whatever it is you’re good at, whatever it is that calls to you — do that. And do it again and again and again and again.

Learn to X.

via kickingbear – Learn to X. I really enjoy that line “Learn to X”. There’s a problem among programmers it’s the classic when you have a hammer everything looks like a nail. Programming/Coding is our hammer, perhaps a really advanced hammer but still just a hammer. I’m not going to predict that programming will never be a part of a basic grade school education, I will however be shocked if it ever occurs. There is a reason the tagline for this site isn’t something like “learning to be a better programmer ever day”, programming is a career choice but not the only thing I want to be skilled at.

28 Dec

The Kernel – The golden age of the developer

There’s never been a better time to be a developer. Thanks to an unprecedented range of open-source software, learning resources and useful web services at our disposal, we can learn new languages, get help, collaborate with others and, if our ideas win traction, there’s now a multitude of investors waiting in the wings to help us build companies around our products.

This is not to say that our work is easy. Standards must remain high. But the resources available offer us the opportunity to move faster and make even more progress. The nature of innovation means that many of our ideas will not succeed, making determination vital for seeing ideas through. But the opportunity is here, my friends. We are the kingmakers.

The good news is that this golden age has made you the developer you are and will continue to help you. The even better news is that you have the chance now to, in the slightly emetic language of the Valley, “pay it forward”.

via The Kernel – The golden age of the developer. I’m trying to do more of this moving forward even in little bits and pieces I think help me stand out as a developer and it’s good to help the community which provides the basis of so much of my daily income (CakePHP, jQuery, etc).