31 Mar

LinkedIn Learning Course – Consuming RESTful APIs in PHP with Guzzle

LinkedIn Learning provides online training courses in a variety of subject matters. I’ve been honored to work with them on a few different courses at this point covering primarily PHP and related topics. The latest one went up earlier this week, it covers using Guzzle to communicate with RESTful APIs. APIs are a super popular tool in web development at practically all skill levels. You might start off just using something simple like the Google Maps API to put up a map on some sites and before you know it, you are building an API to be consumed by other software developers (or at least that was my path).

If you aren’t interested in working with Guzzle or RESTful APIs, take a look at the LinkedIn Learning site in general there are tons of courses on a wide variety of subjects.

You’ll be able to see any new courses I author at https://www.linkedin.com/learning/instructors/justin-yost.

28 Jun

Pastebin.com – Ok, I came up with an example. Programming is like doing a massive sudoku.

Ok, I came up with an example.

Programming is like doing a massive sudoku. But you’re not just doing you’re own square, you have to line up the edges with squares that you’ve already done, or squares other people in your team are working on.

And it’s not just squares that you’ve done, you have to anticipate the sudoku’s you’ll be doing days, weeks or months from now, and leave easy numbers at the edges so it isn’t impossible to do those squares.

And that’s why some programmers are so engrossed in it, and get all worked up, because they’re like "You left a 5 in the middle of the square, what kind of asshole does that, now I’m gonna have to line all my square up with that".

And then someone points out a bug, an you have to trace it back to the square it came from, and then redo that square without screwing up all the other ones.

And after a few hours of that, you either surf facebook and go on IM, or you start growing a beard and forgetting to wash and getting weirdly obsessed with star wars, and people look at you weird and they’re like why do you care about it so much, and through the bleary screen-burnt eyes of your insanity you reply "The squares, can’t you see, the squares, they’re so beautiful"

And that’s why programmers don’t get invited to parties.

What was your question again?

via Pastebin.com – Ok, I came up with an example. Programming is like doing a massive sudoku.. Just a little to close to home.

01 Aug

EETimes – The legend of the superprogrammer

Caper Jones, in an unpublished 1977 study for IBM, found that the very best developers are much more productive than the worst programmer — when working on small projects. The best developer will complete a 1k line of code (LOC) effort 6 times faster than the lousiest. The productivity delta falls to 2x on a 64k LOC project. Beyond a few hundred thousand LOC both sorts of people perform equally well. Or equally poorly.

via EETimes – The legend of the superprogrammer. I think our tendency is to stick awesome programmers on a large task and hope they can lift it up by themselves instead this argues for sticking them on small projects, on the large project they may be more valuable on a very small subset but on the whole just as important or un-important as a normal programmer.