28 Jul

FiveThirtyEight – Politics Done Right: Cap-and-Trade is Dead; Long Live Cap-and-Trade

But my premise is that tax increases are inevitable: it’s a question of who bears those taxes and how they bear them. And at some point Congress — which is surely headed for some massive showdowns over the budget at some point in the next several years — might conclude that cap-and-trade is a more acceptable way to raise revenues than an omnibus tax increase. In fact, cap-and-trade actually polls rather well. That might change as the public learns more about policy and comes to grips with the fact that they’re going to have to bear some of the costs personally. But other than increased taxes on the very wealthy, and some gimmicky stuff like sin taxes and windfall profits taxes that don’t have all that much revenue-generating potential, it polls a lot better than other types of tax increases, and may be a more politically palatable compromise.

via FiveThirtyEight – Politics Done Right: Cap-and-Trade is Dead; Long Live Cap-and-Trade. If I could I would just re-quote the whole article word for word.

07 Mar

U.S. Hopes Internet Exports Will Help Open Closed Societies – NYTimes.com

Seeking to exploit the Internet’s potential for prying open closed societies, the Obama administration will permit technology companies to export online services like instant messaging, chat and photo sharing to Iran, Cuba and Sudan, a senior administration official said Sunday.

via U.S. Hopes Internet Exports Will Help Open Closed Societies – NYTimes.com. An awesome decision for free internet services which are generally geared towards increasing the flow of information into and out of repressive regimes.

04 Jan

The economic statistic of the decade – Reuters

Mike Mandel has four nominees for his “Economic Statistic of the Decade” award, including home prices (obvs), Chinese growth, and global trade. But the most startling one, for me, is US household borrowing:

via The economic statistic of the decade | Analysis & Opinion | Reuters.

I would have to totally agree with this, seeing household borrowing from $200-400 billion to over $1200 billion a year and fall even faster is an interesting trend. Though the implications of it I’m not qualified to speak on it.