26 Jan

whatwg – Requests for new elements for comments

We already have an element for comments and other self-contained document modules, namely, <article>. The spec in fact specifically calls out an <article> nested in another <article> as being, by definition, a comment <article> on the outer <article>

via whatwg – Requests for new elements for comments. Want to do comments on your new spiffy HTML5 site, use an article element inside your main article element.

05 Dec

James Clark’s Random Thoughts – XML vs the Web

There’s a bigger point that I want to make here, and it’s about the relationship between XML and the Web. When we started out doing XML, a big part of the vision was about bridging the gap from the SGML world (complex, sophisticated, partly academic, partly big enterprise) to the Web, about making the value that we saw in SGML accessible to a broader audience by cutting out all the cruft. In the beginning XML did succeed in this respect. But this vision seems to have been lost sight of over time to the point where there’s a gulf between the XML community and the broader Web developer community; all the stuff that’s been piled on top of XML, together with the huge advances in the Web world in HTML5, JSON and JavaScript, have combined to make XML be perceived as an overly complex, enterprisey technology, which doesn’t bring any value to the average Web developer.

This is not a good thing for either community (and it’s why part of my reaction to JSON is "Sigh"). XML misses out by not having the innovation, enthusiasm and traction that the Web developer community brings with it, and the Web developer community misses out by not being able to take advantage of the powerful and convenient technologies that have been built on top of XML over the last decade.

So what’s the way forward? I think the Web community has spoken, and it’s clear that what it wants is HTML5, JavaScript and JSON. XML isn’t going away but I see it being less and less a Web technology; it won’t be something that you send over the wire on the public Web, but just one of many technologies that are used on the server to manage and generate what you do send over the wire.

In the short-term, I think the challenge is how to make HTML5 play more nicely with XML. In the longer term, I think the challenge is how to use our collective experience from building the XML stack to create technologies that work natively with HTML, JSON and JavaScript, and that bring to the broader Web developer community some of the good aspects of the modern XML development experience.

via James Clark’s Random Thoughts – XML vs the Web. I’m not even sure anymore about the idea of XML to manage your server solutions is going to be used much going forward. I’m really leaning towards calling XML an end-of-life technology.

29 Nov

David Walsh Blog – WebSocket and Socket.IO

My favorite web technology is quickly becoming the WebSocket API. WebSocket provides a welcomed alternative to the AJAX technologies we’ve been making use of over the past few years. This new API provides a method to push messages from client to server efficiently and with a simple syntax. Let’s take a look at the HTML5 WebSocket API: it’s use on the client side, server side, and an outstanding wrapper API called Socket.IO.

via David Walsh Blog – WebSocket and Socket.IO. Really great instructional and demo of a neat technology.

17 Oct

QuirksBlog – The HTML5 drag and drop disaster

After spending about a day and a half in testing I am forced to conclude that the HTML5 drag and drop module is not just a disaster, it’s a fucking disaster.

The module should be removed from the HTML5 specification straight away, and conforming browsers should disable it at their earliest opportunity pending a complete rewrite from the ground up.

Web developers MUST NOT (in the sense of RFC 2119) use HTML 5 drag and drop. They should use old-school scripts instead.

via QuirksBlog – The HTML5 drag and drop disaster. So that’s drag and drop kids.

24 Jul

A List Apart – Prefix or Posthack

In terms of repetition and annoyance, yes, the two are very much alike. But they’re fundamentally different in this way: Prefixes give us control of our hacking destiny. In the past, we had to invent a bunch of parser exploits just to get inconsistent implementations to act the same once we found out they were inconsistent. It was a wholly reactive approach. Prefixes are a proactive approach.

via A List Apart – Prefix or Posthack. This is an interesting opinion but I see the logic, eliminates the possibility of broken CSS styles as browsers change and create new standards and abilities.

07 Jun

hsivonen – -webkit-HTML5

The demos have three levels of obstacles for non-Safari browsers even if the other browsers implemented the HTML5 features being demoed (only video and audio; the rest is CSS!) and implemented the proposed CSS features once standardized:

via hsivonen – -webkit-HTML5. Apple promotes open standards by calling them by the wrong name and using the most closed version possible to prevent all other browsers from seeing the effects. Oh and one of the demos doesn’t even work in anything other than the latest version of Mac OSX.

31 May

HTML5 Globals and You – Nettuts+

Much has been written on the big ticket changes in HTML5, like forms, semantics, and media, but information on the less splashy changes is sparse. While global attributes aren’t the most sexy change of HTML5, they are the change that you will be using over and over and over as you migrate to the new specification.

via HTML5 Globals and You – Nettuts+. The most interesting attributes (to me) contextmenu and hidden are currently not usable by any browser engine.

31 Jan

Google Twists Knife In IE6, Pulls Support From Docs And Sites – TechCrunch

This has not been the greatest start to the year for Microsoft’s Internet Explorer browser. Days after news of the latest security flaw in Internet Explorer, Google is adding fuel to the fire by phasing out support for IE6 for two of its Google Apps products, Docs and Sites (which recently got an aesthetic upgrade).

via Google Twists Knife In IE6, Pulls Support From Docs And Sites.

The push for dropping IE6 just got a big boost from Google.