18 Jul

The Watchmaker Project – How to fix the broken iPad form label click issue

Mobile Safari, the browser found on iPhones, iPod Touches and the iPad, does not (currently) implement the same label behaviour as other browsers. Clicking on labels doesn’t do anything—possibly, as Ben Darlow suggests, it is because it would interfere with the tap-to-select-text functionality, although personally I think that usability trumps obscure text-selection use cases.

What’s even weirder is that, in over an hour of googling, I couldn’t find a single reference to this issue. Surely someone, somewhere must have noticed that clicking or tapping on labels in forms on iPad doesn’t select the input? I resolved that when I published a fix for the issue, it would include a couple of clunky sentences stuffed with as many keywords related to the tap click form label input select checkbox radio button problem as possible…

via The Watchmaker Project – How to fix the broken iPad form label click issue. Nice and simple fix, defiantly not quite as common a problem on the iPhone (rarely do I find myself wanting to hit the label vs. the input field).

31 Mar

Mobile Boilerplate

Mobile Boilerplate is your trusted template made custom for creating rich and performant mobile web apps. You get cross-browser consistency among A-grade smartphones, and fallback support for legacy Blackberry, Symbian, and IE Mobile. Mobile Boilerplate is not a framework, but works well with projects like jQuery Mobile, Sencha Touch, Phonegap and Appcelerator. You get an offline caching setup for free, fast button clicks, a media query polyfill, and many common mobile WebKit optimizations waiting for you. Use Mobile Boilerplate to start your mobile webapp quickly and immediately benefit from community best practices.

via Mobile Boilerplate. Awesome resource.

24 Jan

Alexander Limi – Mythbusting: Why Firefox 4 won’t score 100 on Acid3

Every once in a while — especially around the time of an upcoming new release — people argue that Firefox isn’t standards compliant, since it doesn’t score 100 on this test, but has been scoring 97 for quite a while, and will probably never implement what’s required to reach a score of 100.

via Alexander Limi – Mythbusting: Why Firefox 4 won’t score 100 on Acid3. Interesting stuff, though admittedly this is inside baseball stuff even for me.

17 Jan

CSS-Tricks – Rotating Feature Boxes

The full effect of it (with transition animations) will work in newish WebKit and Opera browsers and Firefox 4 (in real beta as of today). Any other browser will rotate the blocks without transition animation.

via CSS-Tricks – Rotating Feature Boxes. Pretty neat trick, rotate through boxes of html content and display subtitles when the boxes is on the side.

24 Jul

A List Apart – Prefix or Posthack

In terms of repetition and annoyance, yes, the two are very much alike. But they’re fundamentally different in this way: Prefixes give us control of our hacking destiny. In the past, we had to invent a bunch of parser exploits just to get inconsistent implementations to act the same once we found out they were inconsistent. It was a wholly reactive approach. Prefixes are a proactive approach.

via A List Apart – Prefix or Posthack. This is an interesting opinion but I see the logic, eliminates the possibility of broken CSS styles as browsers change and create new standards and abilities.

05 Jul

QuirksBlog – IE’s big leap forward; CSS3 selectors fully supported

In the past few days I’ve been revising the CSS compatibility table with information about the latest crop of browsers. There’s no doubt about it: this is IE9’s show. It just supports nearly everything. No hassle, no buts.

Besides, CSS3 selectors are now fully supported by all browsers but one. And that one browser is not IE. It’s, curiously, Opera.

via QuirksBlog – IE’s big leap forward; CSS3 selectors fully supported. Awesome news and big kudos to the IE team for turning IE into a real browser.

07 Jun

hsivonen – -webkit-HTML5

The demos have three levels of obstacles for non-Safari browsers even if the other browsers implemented the HTML5 features being demoed (only video and audio; the rest is CSS!) and implemented the proposed CSS features once standardized:

via hsivonen – -webkit-HTML5. Apple promotes open standards by calling them by the wrong name and using the most closed version possible to prevent all other browsers from seeing the effects. Oh and one of the demos doesn’t even work in anything other than the latest version of Mac OSX.

31 May

HTML5 Globals and You – Nettuts+

Much has been written on the big ticket changes in HTML5, like forms, semantics, and media, but information on the less splashy changes is sparse. While global attributes aren’t the most sexy change of HTML5, they are the change that you will be using over and over and over as you migrate to the new specification.

via HTML5 Globals and You – Nettuts+. The most interesting attributes (to me) contextmenu and hidden are currently not usable by any browser engine.